Tag Archives: outsider art

Letting it all Hang Out

On Thursday afternoon I was walking around looking at galleries and the street art in Richmond and Cremorne. Why not they are just on either side of the Richmond train line. Well, Block Projects is further down Stephenson Street than that but there was some street art to keep me amused along the way.

Block Projects had a great exhibition by Richard Grigg. At first I thought have I walked into an exhibition by a group of intellectually challenged individuals. It looked awkward, stumbling and obvious. “It is a very brave exhibition,” Malcolm, from Block Projects told me. It is indeed; he is letting it all hang out, as they would say in the sixties. Grigg’s unconscious is so close to the surface you can see its periscope, conning tower and the wake

I walk around again to appreciate just how much Grigg’s is pushing himself in all directions. There is the crude, the childlike, the doodle-like, comic book, symbolic, text-based, graphomania, and ultra-fine drawings splashed with other stuff. Grigg’s large pencil drawing on paper are excellent, especially the sleeping crocodile being teased by branches and bladders in “tickle, tickle, I will save you” and the pile of dead animals in “after the flood”. It is all wonderfully surreal in an entirely contemporary way.

Across the railway tracks I wandered the back streets looking for galleries and street art – a few good pieces including this magnificent side of a house by Reka. Finally I found Place Gallery amid the many warehouse conversations.

Reka, house wall Richmond

Place Gallery had an exhibition by Glenn Morgan. There are 8 paintings along with 3 of the wood and tin diorama sculptures that are Morgan’s signature work. Morgan is also letting it all hang out with his art; in his large panoramas he shows the turmoil of everyday life in detail with speech balloons. There is a series telling the personal story of his relationship with his uncle.

Glen Morgan is also exhibiting a series of paintings that tell the story of Victoria’s drought. There is including one great, epic history painting, “Global Warming” that shows drought, bushfires and floods. You don’t get many history paintings anymore; they used to be so popular.

It struck me looking at Glen Morgan exhibition and considering Richard Grigg’s exhibition that Glenn Morgan doesn’t appear to be such an outsider artist anymore. It is not that Morgan’s art has changed the world has caught up with him. On the streets and in the galleries the artists are letting it all hang out.


Cunningham Dax Collection

There are several galleries devoted to the work of outsider artists, most notably the Art Brut Gallery in Switzerland and Melbourne’s Cunningham Dax Collection. I hadn’t been to the Cunningham Dax Collection before but it is one of the few galleries that are open in the first week of 2010. Most of Melbourne’s galleries are closed for a couple of weeks over the New Year period; except for some big public galleries, like the National Gallery of Victoria. The collection is named after its founder Dr Eric Cunningham Dax who in 1946 pioneered the place of art therapy in mainstream psychiatric treatment.

Above the purple entrance doors, there is the gallery sign and slogan: “art, creativity and education in mental health”. Inside the Cunningham Dax Collection there are two large gallery rooms, a small side gallery, a video lounge and a large room containing a library, research area and office. The collection itself consists of over 12,000 works, held in a climate controlled storage room.

I didn’t see the main collection, just the current temporary exhibition. Out of the Dark: the Emotional Legacy of the Holocaust is an exhibition of artwork by survivors, child survivors and the children of survivors of the Holocaust. The Cunningham Dax Collections proposes a multi-dimensional approach to their collection as a clinical record, art, historical artefact and education material as opposed to “objects of curiosity and amusement”. This is not outsider art as it is traditionally defined but creative work of people who have experienced mental illness and trauma. There are some quality works of art in the exhibition along with others were better viewed as clinical records or historical artefacts, but regardless of the quality of the work in the exhibition there was a unity of shared of trauma. Trauma shared across generations is the well documented by this exhibition.

Some of the works on exhibition are by trained artists. There is a great surreal photograph by Hedy Ritterman, who was the winner of the Linden Gallery’s 2003 Hocking Stuart Award. And the central work by Michelle Fox, “People I should have known or should have known more” 2009, a mixed media installation, was a playful, child-like response to trauma. Fox’s installation reminds the viewer of play is a thoughtful system that creates a magical substitute world. Fox has created a substitute extended family of dolls on a field of playing cards; small guidebooks provides details to the figures in this substitute world but the striking feature of these substitute people is that they are almost featureless and unknown.

There are plans to relocate the Cunningham Dax Collection to a purpose built gallery space in the Department of Neuroscience at Melbourne University’s main campus in lat 2011.


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