Monthly Archives: April 2015

Street Art Sculptures 6

Discarded

Discarded

Walking up Hosier Lane on probably the last warm day of the year, enjoying the location, admiring the callipygian women in their shorts and watching the people as much as the walls. A busker is playing a guitar; I haven’t seen that many buskers in Hosier Lane even though there always lots of people there.

A man drives his Harley Davidson up steep incline of the bluestone lane to photograph his hog in front of one of the walls. A seriously good looking motorcycle but not a serious photographer using his cell phone. It is always interesting to see how different people use this laneway in Melbourne, a reminder that there are many ways of living life.

unknown, Back in My Day, 2015

unknown, Back in My Day, 2015

I also have an objective in Hosier Lane besides people watching. I am on a mission to collect more photographs of street art sculptures. There is a lot of it about, enough for another blog post. Not only because Will Coles has endowed Melbourne with many new works in a recent visit from his home in Sydney but because there are more street artists doing three dimensional work.

Fee-Rye, monster, 2014

Fee-Rye, monster, 2014

unknown, Mr Flip Flop, 2015

unknown, Mr Flip Flop, 2015

I know about Discarded but I still don’t know about all the new artists, like the Flip Flop artist. Who is doing these great spray cans? GT

unknown, Lunar Park Can, 2015

GT, Lunar Park Can, 2015

Will Coles has a lot of new work around Melbourne. His cast designer purse with the word ‘Fake’ and the designer handbag with the word ‘Consume’ in Hosier Lane are a big hit with the anti-fashionistas. His discarded shoe appears forgotten.

Will Coles, Fake, 2015

Will Coles, Fake, 2015

Will Coles, Consume, 2015

Will Coles, Consume, 2015

Will Coles, Forgot'n, 2015

Will Coles, Forgot’n, 2015

I want to keep up with recent street art sculpture partially what I’ve written in the final chapter of my book, Melbourne’s Sculpture; that street art sculptures are the most recent type of public sculpture. This should not be confused with being the ultimate type of public sculpture, street art sculptures are not about to replace the established types of public sculpture. I also admire the tenacity and ingenuity of anyone who makes a durable sculpture and install it in the street with or without permission.

For more street art sculpture:

Street Art Sculpture 5

10 Great Street Installation 2014

Street Art Sculpture III 2012

More Street Art Sculpture 2010

Street Art Sculpture 2009


Space and Waves @ Tinning Street

Tinning Street presents Tateru, an exhibition of sculpture by Paul Gorman and Takahiko Sugawara.

Paul Gorman is exhibiting several photographs. Why is a sculptor exhibiting photographs? Although the photographs are not simply documentary images of Gorman’s sculpture, they do document ephemeral sculptural moments, moments of space and form. Ring of Confidence is a time-lapse photograph of the movement of light around a tree creating a sculptural form. This is why, in art-speak refers to contemporary sculpture as ‘spatial practice’ because it is art that uses three dimensional space.

Paul Gorman Home Built; Lego House (1,II, III)

Paul Gorman Home Built; Lego House (1,II, III)

Home Built; Lego House (1,II, III) are three simplified blocky familiar forms cast in bronze. It is Gorman’s sculptures of houses in his exhibition really hit me because I was thinking about the suburbs with all the neighbourhood events on the day I visited. (For more about that day read my post Neighbourhood.) Although Jason Waterhouse has covered similar territory with sculptures, Gorman brings his lyrical and critical thinking to the subject.

Takahiko Sugawara, Wave (detail)

Takahiko Sugawara, Wave (detail)

The dozen sculptures of Takahiko Sugawara are post-minimalist, made up of small wooden pieces that brought together create complex rhythmic waves like a composition by Steve Reich. These are mostly wall works and a couple of small free standing block sculptures that take the post-minimalism back to a minimalist cube.

Apart from variations in size or shape Sugawara’s sculptures are of such an even quality that my attention was drawn to a large wall piece, Circles wondering why it didn’t work as well as the others. It’s flatter and the roughly circular pieces of pinewood are a less definite form. Putting these together lacked both the rhythm and the geometric complexity of Sugawara’s other sculptures.

Although both Gorman and Sugawara’s sculptures are very different they find a harmonious combination in this exhibition. Both Gorman and Sugawara are members of the committee of the Contemporary Sculptures Association.


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