Tag Archives: Julian Opie

Pt Leo Estate Sculpture Park

At the end of a road in a vineyard, a massive Inge King sculpture stands at the entrance leading the visitor into a stunning curved space with a bottle tree in the middle. Inside is a wine bar and ticket office. Beyond a sculpture park with works by prominent local and international sculptors.

Pt Leo Estate is a private sculpture park on a vineyard on the Mornington Peninsula. It plays its part in attracting visitors to the vineyard, where the sales at the cellar door would be worth more than the ticket sales to the sculpture park.

It is a collection interested in prestige, and showing off the collection is part of the reason for having it. Although the sculpture park was only established in 2017, the wealthy owners had collected sculptures for decades before. It consists of a standard set of notable international and local sculptors, Julian Opie’s White Horse, an Anthony Gormley behind the ticket desk, and some of the familiar names in the history of Australian sculpture. About half a dozen sculptures by Robbert Kippel stand amongst a grove of trees.

However, Inge King and Deborah Halpern are the only women in a collection dominated by male sculptors. It reflects the owners. It is a rich man’s collection. Bright colours, surreal creations, pop sensations, elegant forms and plenty of figurative pieces. Unlike public collections, there is no obligation for a private collector to have a broad or representative.

The sculptures have some magnificent borrowed scenery, with views of Phillip Island and the entrance to Western Port Bay. There are two well-laid and comfortable walking trails around the park, a smaller loop and a longer one. The formal park setting with its mown lawns, clipped hedges and even tufted grass cut into cones. The sculptures are plonked in this landscape. At best, the landscape manipulated around them, a grove of trees or a pond. This is to be expected for modern sculptures. The modern world imposed itself on everything, but the setting doesn’t bring out the best in contemporary sculpture which are often more site specific.

Lenton Parr, Vega

Modern sculptures attempt to control the landscape by extending form into space. Fabricated metal forms framing views. This can be seen in Vega by local sculptor Lenton Parr. In this sculpture, Parr is influenced by his contemporary, the British sculptor Anthony Caro. And the influence of Caro is evident in several other sculptures in the park, including Robertson-Swann, and Michael Le Grand.

The collection is not without humour or a sense of fun. There is Richard Tipping’s sign, Private poetry , and an Erwin Wurm fat car. Neither of these works can be taken as serious or political; in the luxury surroundings, they can only be taken as ironic. Les Kossatz’s sculptures are often humorous and political; however, Laban’s seal III makes vague references to contested land through obscure Biblical references.

Adrian Murik, Impulse

The highlight for me was the pond with Adrian Muriks’ Impulse. Two of the sculptural elements are floating like masses of soap bubbles, one a duck-like form, moving around depending on the wind and creating an ever-changing scene. His white biomorphic forms are joyful and fun.

I’m not sure why I resisted tasting and reviewing the estate’s wine, perhaps sticking to my actual area of expertise.

Andrew Rogers, Rise 1 with other sculptures in background

Opie @ NGV

Julian Opie’s art is cool. It seems essential to his aesthetic. Feeding back from his cool is Opie’s association with pop music. He did the cover the of Blur: the best of (2000) and LED images for U2’s Vertigo world tour (2006).

Julian Opie, Walking in Melbourne 1, 2018

Julian Opie, Walking in Melbourne 1, 2018

There isn’t much to his images. Each has been reduced to the essential lines and shapes. The images are refined to minimise details. They are refined again in their manufacturing. Vinyl on wooden stretcher or laser cut anodised aluminium; processes that doesn’t leave a trace of the human hand.

From the LED displays of people walking in the forecourt to the fish swim across the NGV’s water wall entrance; the self-titled Opie exhibition leads the visitor into the two galleries of his work and onto the NGV Kids part. The NGV Kids interactive part was designed in collaboration with Opie; do your own portrait in the style of…

Julian Opie, View of Moon over Manatsuru peninsula, 2007

Julian Opie, View of Moon over Manatsuru peninsula, 2007

In the exhibition there is a respectful bow to Japanese art in his View of Moon over Manatsuru peninsula, 2007. Two LCD screens replace the traditional byōbu folding screens of rice paper but the format of the composition is the same. The lights reflected on the rippling water, the flashing lights of a plane flying in the star light sky, the moon still in the sky. There is something cool about refining kitsch lighting-feature landscapes; falling just short of being vacuous, insipid and vapid is cool.

Who are these people walking, running, jogging, dancing in Opie’s art? Faime, Marrie Teresa, Bruce and Sara? …Oh, and there is Julian in a t-shirt. There are two works titled: Walking in Melbourne 2018. I do a lot of walking in Melbourne; maybe I could be one of the people in the picture, maybe not.

The people are the same as Opie’s sheep or minnows. His landscapes, even when of a specific location, are generic enough to be anywhere. It is not great art but they are cool.


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