Tag Archives: Ten Cubed

Space is the place

Black space, white space

The space between

The distance between the art

The silence between the notes

The space between words; a space that was lacking for centuries. Inancientlatintherewerenospacesbetweenwordsmakingcomprehensionoftextdifficult. No wonder Julius Cesar was regarded as intelligent when he was able to comprehend writing on first reading. Spaces allowed for easier comprehension, just as the kerning between printed letters makes them more readable.

Ten Cubed Gallery

Is space empty, undefined and unwritten, the tabula rasa, or designed, created? Is space simply a frame that excludes an absence or a defined absence to define another presence? There are both aesthetic and practical considerations to space. Space as a traffic management issue, as a place to be temporarily occupied. Space as a traffic management issue, as a place to be temporarily occupied.

“Where’s the edge?/Where does the frame start?” Brian Eno and Peter Schmidt Oblique Strategy

I’ve heard that Brian Eno has a preferred time between music tracks on a record to be included on CDs, but I can’t find a reference. The standard used to be between 3-6 seconds, depending on the record company. It is a space that has been messed around with by DJs and current music technology. The time between events creates daily, weekly, annually rhythms like the time between meals allows for digestion. The space between television episodes can be edited to skip credits and intro. The phrase ‘binge watching’ indicates an unhealthy approach to consuming media.

Exhibitions of paintings started with them displayed tightly packed from floor to ceiling.However, over the last century, the space between works of visual arts has generally increased. Contemporary art is often a single work per gallery space, requiring a corridor or at least a wall to have enough space between it and the subsequent art. This means that there are often enormous art galleries with almost no artworks, a gift to architects who want to design massive buildings containing huge spaces. Part of this requirement for space is because contemporary arts are using the art gallery as a conceptual frame for art while breaking conceptual boundaries like actors breaking the fourth wall. Artists are finding frames outside of the apparent structures and using the space between them. It would be impossible to ‘read’ a room packed with multiple works of contemporary art as one would bleed into the next.  Another reason is the curators values the space almost as highly as the art.

Gallery space is a recurrent subject for my blog posts; lots of words about nothing. In the past I have written about playing with this empty relationship in the great gallery joke, how space is defined and how it defines the art in the art space race, the empty space in art galleries, and the white room.


Private Collection Public Exhibition

Walking past Ten Cubed you might think that it is another commercial gallery, it is a shop front art gallery, except that there are no price tags. You might also notice, if you regularly pass the shops along Malvern Road in Glen Iris that the exhibitions only change every three months. You would notice that Ten Cubed is a purpose built gallery with the usual grey concrete floor and white walls. Designed by Ron Unger Architects, the building sits on a narrow shopfront footprint, giving the six metre high front space has tall and narrow cathedral-like proportions.

 Ten Cubed

Its current exhibition is So Far… works from the Ten Cubed collection. For the gallery is a collection project of Dianne Gringlas with advice from her sister-in-law Ada Moshinsky. This is not a random collection of art, Ten Cubed has depth and rigour to its collection program. It is a ten year project to collect ten works by ten contemporary Australian and New Zealand artists represented by commercial galleries, like Arc One, Sutton or Murray White Room.

Ten Cubed is a private art collection on public exhibition, like MONA in Hobart but on a smaller scale and free for the public to visit. In this and other ways it is similar to small institutional art galleries, with its permanent staff and an education program. Private collections on public exhibition are a new feature of Australia’s art world; the Ten Cubed collection has only been going for five years but has only had a gallery for the last three. There are other small private galleries that are open to the public including Lyon Housemuseum in Melbourne and White Rabbit Gallery in Sydney.

What is the point of having an art collection if very few people see it? The art in some private collections are removed from the discourse of the art world and are therefore less significant. As Ten Cubed website states: “art should be shown, not stored.” Not that there isn’t art in storage at the gallery, as all of the art in the collection can’t be on exhibition at the gallery or the Gringlas’s home.

The artists that are currently on exhibition are Pat Brassington, Jonathan Delafield Cook, Alasdair McLuckie, Tim Silver, Anne-Marie May, David Rosetzky, Daniel von Sturmer and David Wadelton. There is no simple way to sum these contemporary artists up and Ten Cubed’s collection is not intended to make a statement (or even to be sensational like MONA). The mediums ranged from David Wadelton’s depiction of suburban glamour, now cockroach free with water on tap, in oil on canvas, Land of opportunity. To Anne-Marie May’s Untitled thermally folded acrylic sculpture hanging from the ceiling like an airburst of colour. To David Rosetzky’s video Half Brother that combines contemporary dance with work on paper.


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